Turning Failure Into Success

Image via theresadelgado.com

Image via theresadelgado.com

Failure is inevitable and if you don’t learn how to bounce back whenever it happens, you’ll find yourself stuck in a rut for a very long time.

How do you handle failure and turn it into a learning experience, one that helps guide you back onto the path of success? Here are a few ways you can confront failure to make it work for you:

  • Reflect Without Regret – Reflection time is important because it allows you to take a clear look at what happened, why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening in the future. If you close off your mindset and focus only how bad you feel, you’ll be unable to learn from the situation and you won’t get much out of your reflection time.
  • Ask For Constructive Criticism – Mentorship is a very important thing to have while you are trying to find the path to success. You will need constructive criticism from someone who can help you examine what you gathered from your reflection process. Choose a mentor who isn’t afraid to tell you the truth and who has been where you are. This person will guide you with constructive criticism, meaning that rather than put you down, they will show you how to get back up.
  • Revise Your Plan – Now that you know what works and what doesn’t, make revisions to your business practices. If cold calls were not successful, then don’t make them anymore. Find a different way to engage with potential new customers and clients. If your marketing proved more effective online than via mail, focus on how to keep generating attention to your business through your social media strategies.

If it helps to document these reflections, keep a journal you can write in at least once a week where you note down things that went great and which things needed to be better. You don’t have to be a great writer, just someone who can take down notes in a way that makes sense when you go back to read them. Perhaps make two columns headed “What Works” and “What Didn’t.”

Failure will happen, but it doesn’t mean that you need to give up. As part of your personal development, it means that you need to embrace that learning experience and make it work for you so that you keep moving forward with your business.

Learn more from Aaron Parkinson by connecting with him on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

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Why Plot Spoilers Might Be The Best Thing For Your Favorite TV Shows

Image via digitaltrends.com

Image via digitaltrends.com

For huge fans of television, one of the worst things is logging onto the internet only to find that people are spoiling the plot of the latest episode of their favorite television shows. Even worse is having friends in a different time zone who get to react to the show first and then post all over Facebook or Twitter about it.

As bad as TV spoilers seem, they could actually be great for television execs who want to keep great TV shows renewed for new seasons. They want to know that people feel a sense of urgency to watch the shows as soon as possible, preferably during their actual air times, rather than file them away in DVRs or downloading them on the internet.

What they are possibly hoping for is that people will finally stay up to date with television shows and watch them as they actually air rather than risk having the plot spoiled by blog posts or status updates.

While people are complaining that the internet is posting too many important giveaways, they might not be realizing that those write ups are actually being encouraged by the same people who put together the marketing for those programs. So it’s not so much that someone is being terrible and giving away the ending for the sake of being the first to talk about it, but rather, you are expected to keep up with your favorite show.

It’s just in our TV and film watching culture now to set those indulgences aside and then marathon through them. With so many great shows being made available on Netflix and other streaming platforms, it’s no wonder people are finally plowing through seasons’ worth of shows like Orange Is The New Black, The Wire, and Bates Motel, some of which aired on television first before they were made available for streaming.

If you don’t want the latest episode of your favorite show to be spoiled for you, then obviously you can’t exactly log into your favorite social media site without seeing someone talking about it. You’ll either have to be okay with that or just stay away when you know people will be posting about the show, which is usually when it airs. Besides, you will likely be too busy watching it at that time to be checking your newsfeed. It’s what the TV execs want!

Learn more from Aaron Parkinson by connecting with him on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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